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Online Figurative Language Practice

Are you looking to give your students practice with identifying figurative language techniques? How would you like to positively impact the environment by not using paper to print out worksheets? And how do you feel about saving time by not grading assignments?

For these reasons and more, you should use ereading worksheets in your classroom. If you have access to computers, you can use these figurative language practice activities to give your students experience with recognizing instances of figurative language. Additionally, if you have your own classroom website, I’ve included the code to embed them on your site without adds. Check them out:


Figurative Language Practice 1 – ten practice problems to help your students reinforce their figurative language skills.
Click Here to Begin Figurative Language Practice Test 1 with Multiple Choice Questions Only
Click Here to Begin Figurative Language Practice Test 1 with Long Response

Figurative Language Practice 2 – ten more challenging problems where students distinguish between simile, metaphor, hyperbole, and personification.
Click Here to Begin Figurative Language Practice Test 2 with Multiple Choice Questions Only
Click Here to Begin Figurative Language Practice Test 2 with Long Response Questions

Figurative Language Practice 3 – Here is another online figurative language test. This one has 27 problems.
Click Here to Begin Figurative Language Practice Test 3 with Multiple Choice Questions Only
Click Here to Begin Figurative Language Practice Test 3 with Long Response Questions

Figurative Language Practice 4 – Another online figurative language practice test. This one has ten problems.
Click Here to Begin Figurative Language Practice Test 4 with Long Response Questions

Figurative Language Practice 5 – Wow! More online figurative language practice for students. Ten new problems with long response questions.
Click Here to Begin Figurative Language Practice Test 5 with Long Response Questions

Figurative Language Practice 6 – Why stop now when you can keep practicing your figurative language skills? This one has twenty multiple choice problems with long response boxes for answer explanations.
Click Here to Begin Figurative Language Practice Test 6 with Long Response Questions

Figurative Language Practice 7 – What’s that? Your students want more figurative language practice? Well, let’s give them what they want. Here are ten more problems with long responses.
Click Here to Begin Figurative Language Practice Test 7 with Long Response Questions

Figurative Language Practice 8 – Did you know that you can complete these activities on any tablet, smart phone, or computer with a modern browser? It’s true. And here are twenty more figurative language problems to prove it.
Click Here to Begin Figurative Language Practice Test 8 with Long Response Questions

Figurative Language Practice 9 – If you’re going to keep practicing your figurative language skills, you might as well do so twenty problems at a time. Here is another whopping figurative language practice test to help students master this essential reading skill.
Click Here to Begin Figurative Language Practice Test 9 with Long Response Questions

Figurative Language in Lord of the Flies – Here are twenty online figurative language practice problems to help your students review their figurative language skills. These examples are taken from Golding’s classic novel, Lord of the Flies.
Click Here to Begin the Lord of the Flies Figurative Language Practice Activity

Figurative Language of Edgar Allan Poe – Ten more figurative language practice problems. In this activity the examples are removed from classic texts written by Edgar Allan Poe. I hope that your students are not too scared to complete this assignment.
Click Here to Begin the Figurative Language from Texts by Edgar Allan Poe Practice Activity

Figurative Language of Shakespeare Practice – William Shakespeare is widely regarded as one of the best writers in the English language. Much of this praise is due to his deft use of figurative language. Practice decoding some of his tricky techniques with this figurative language practice activity. This interactive activity has 20 examples of figurative language taken from his tragedies, comedies, history plays, and sonnets.
Click Here to Begin the Figurative Language of Shakespeare Practice Activity

Hyperbole and Understatement

Here are some online activities to help students better understand hyperbole and understatement. In each activity, students read 20 examples of hyperbole and understatement. They determine whether each is an example of hyperbole or understatement, and then they explain their answers and what is being understated or hyperbolized.
Hyperbole and Understatement Practice 1
Hyperbole and Understatement Practice 2
Hyperbole and Understatement Practice 3
Hyperbole and Understatement Practice 4

Similes and Metaphors

Similes and metaphors are frequently confused. They both deal with comparisons between two or more things. These activities will help students better distinguish between similes and metaphors. In each activity, students read 20 figurative language examples taken from poems. Students determine whether each is a simile or a metaphor, then they explain which two things are being compared. If you really want to challenge students, ask them to translate each example into literal language. That’s one way to differentiate instruction with this activity and a high-performing group of students. In either event, these activities should give students the practice that they need with distinguishing similes and metaphors.
Simile and Metaphor Practice 1
Simile and Metaphor Practice 2
Simile and Metaphor Practice 3
Simile and Metaphor Practice 4

 

Common Core State Standards Related to Figurative Language

Anchor Standards

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.R.4 – Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining technical, connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word choices shape meaning or tone.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.L.5 – Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.

Expand to View All Common Core State Standards Related to Figurative Language
ELA Standards: Literature

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.3.4 – Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, distinguishing literal from nonliteral language.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.4.4 – Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including those that allude to significant characters found in mythology (e.g., Herculean).

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.5.4 – Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative language such as metaphors and similes.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.6.4 – Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of a specific word choice on meaning and tone.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.7.4 – Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of rhymes and other repetitions of sounds (e.g., alliteration) on a specific verse or stanza of a poem or section of a story or drama.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.8.4 – Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including analogies or allusions to other texts.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.4 – Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language evokes a sense of time and place; how it sets a formal or informal tone).

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.4 – Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful. (Include Shakespeare as well as other authors.)

ELA Standards: Language

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.3.5 – Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships and nuances in word meanings.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.4.5a – Explain the meaning of simple similes and metaphors (e.g., as pretty as a picture) in context.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.4.5b – Recognize and explain the meaning of common idioms, adages, and proverbs.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.5.5a – Interpret figurative language, including similes and metaphors, in context.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.5.5b – Recognize and explain the meaning of common idioms, adages, and proverbs.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.6.5a – Interpret figures of speech (e.g., personification) in context.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.5a – Interpret figures of speech (e.g., literary, biblical, and mythological allusions) in context.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.8.5a – Interpret figures of speech (e.g. verbal irony, puns) in context.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.5a – Interpret figures of speech (e.g., euphemism, oxymoron) in context and analyze their role in the text.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.11-12.5a – Interpret figures of speech (e.g., hyperbole, paradox) in context and analyze their role in the text.

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Common Core Lesson and Unit Plans
Understanding Common Core State Standards

 

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6 Comments

  1. Austin

     /  March 24, 2017

    this going to be hard..

    Reply
  2. davidbuster

     /  January 19, 2017

    good website……..

    Reply
  3. Vusi

     /  August 21, 2016

    Good web site but I don’t understand the word,do not look far enough beyond their dreams is it literal or figurative meaning?

    Reply
  4. James Bailey

     /  March 30, 2016

    This is a great website for kids to preteens

    Reply
  5. huzaifa aamir

     /  February 27, 2016

    this website is good for children to prepare for exams because i am the student of class seven and study in sms aga khan school and in my mid term exam i prepare from this website and i agot a plus in all subjects. i am female.

    Reply

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