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Making Predictions Worksheets

Making predictions is a basic reading skill that requires higher level thinking. To make a good prediction, readers must consider available information and make an inference. Good readers make predictions based on textual evidence. If you use evidence to support your predication, you can justify it whether you are right or wrong.

I designed these worksheets to give students intensive practice with making and supporting predictions. In each worksheet students read a variety of short texts. Each passage ends abruptly and then students must predict what will occur next based on evidence from the text. Students must support their answers by referencing the text, which brings out those higher order, critical thinking skills. I’ve also included a PowerPoint lesson on making predictions. I hope that these worksheets and activities will help students master the art of making predictions.


Making Predictions Worksheet 1 – Here are ten practice problems to give students practice with making predictions. Students read short passages, determine what will happen next, and support their predictions with evidence. Suggested reading level for this text: Grade 4-8
Making Predictions Worksheet 1 RTF
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Making Predictions Worksheet 2 – This worksheet has five reading passages and ten questions. Students are required to support their predictions with textual evidence. What more could you ask for in a prediction worksheet? Suggested reading level for this text: Grade 3-7
Making Predictions Worksheet 2 RTF
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Making Predictions Worksheet 3 – Here’s another double-sided prediction worksheet! Students read the passages, predict what will occur next, support their answers with text. This is great practice. Suggested reading level for this text: Grade 3-7
Making Predictions Worksheet 3 RTF
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Making Predictions Worksheet 4 – Here is yet another predictions worksheet. It has ten more problems requiring students to support their predictions with text. Suggested reading level for this text: Grade 3-7
Making Predictions Worksheet 4 RTF
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Making Predictions Lesson – This is an animated PowerPoint slideshow that teaches students about making predictions. This slideshow includes tips and examples about making predictions as well as a practice activity at the end of the lesson.
Making Predictions Lesson | PowerPoint

Common Core State Standards Related to Inferences / Predictions

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.R.1 – Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text.

Expand to View All Common Core State Standards Related to Making Predictions

Reading: Literacy Standards

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.4.1 -Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.5.1 -Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.6.1 -Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.7.1 -Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.8.1 -Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.1 -Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.1 – Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.

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Common Core Lesson and Unit Plans
Understanding Common Core State Standards

 

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8 Comments

  1. Lisa

     /  October 26, 2016

    My question is, in the mind of the student is there a right or wrong answer?

    As an example with Mr. Fox and Mr. RAbbit. Its obvious as an adult, one may get shot. I however do not want to take that route with my son. In his perception can they both have gotten scared and run off?
    That also can be supported.

    Reply
  2. Di R

     /  October 21, 2016

    I have found your worksheets particularly helpful. Thank you very much!

    Reply
  3. Anastacia Miller

     /  March 21, 2016

    Thank you!! I love your work! I use these in my classroom and they help my students a lot. Finding quality resources can be a hassle, but you’ve made yours free for all to use. THANKS!!

    Reply
  4. Cathy W

     /  July 30, 2015

    Thanks so much for making these available. I teach Deaf and Hard of Hearing students in Australia, who often have difficulty with predictions and inference. I have battled to find a set suitable for a High School student, rather than the ones I have in abundance for younger students, so these are great! Thanks for saving me so much time.

    Reply
  5. Sherry Walker

     /  May 6, 2015

    Hi. I’m a speech and language pathologist at the high school level. Your worksheets look helpful for some of my students with various language goals. However, one thing I’ve noticed as I’ve looked them over is that there are a number of spelling and grammar-type errors. It would be nice if they were proof-read a little closer. Thanks.

    Reply
    • Thanks for visiting. I am actually a decent grammarian, but I’m just one man. Please report errors as you see them and I will fix them. Best wishes.

      Reply

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