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Simile and Metaphor Worksheets

Similes and metaphors are related figurative language techniques. Both similes and metaphors draw comparisons between two or more things; however, there are some key differences between them. Similes always use the word like or the word as to make the comparison. Metaphors do not use the word like or as. Consequently, metaphors can be more implicit and harder to identify.

Here’s an example to help you understand my point: I was lost in the blue, unclouded heaven of her eyes. This is an example of a metaphor. The speaker is comparing her eyes to heaven, but this is not done explicitly. The comparison is implied. Here is the same example but turned into a simile: Her eyes are like blue, unclouded heaven. In this example the comparison is more explicit. It is easier to identify that the speaker is making a comparison.


The worksheets and activities on this page will give students laser focused practice (implicit metaphor BTW) to help them become simile and metaphor experts. These worksheets are available in a variety of formats: PDF files for printing exactly as I formatted these worksheets, RTF files for making changes before using them in your own classroom, and Ereading Worksheets for completing online on any Internet connected device.

Simile and Metaphor Worksheet 1 – This worksheet has 20 examples of simile and metaphor. Students read each example, determine whether it is a simile or metaphor, then explain which two things are being compared. Want to differentiate instruction and make it harder for some students? Ask your high performing pupils to translate each example to literal language as well. Have them explain what the speaker is saying without the poetic devices. With two double-sided sheets, this worksheet is as occupying as it is helpful.
Simile and Metaphor Worksheet 1 | RTF
Simile and Metaphor Worksheet 1 | PDF
Simile and Metaphor Worksheet 1 | Preview
Simile and Metaphor Worksheet 1 | Answers
Simile and Metaphor Worksheet 1 | Ereading Worksheet – Online Activity

Simile and Metaphor Worksheet 2 – Here’s another 20 simile and metaphor examples to help students master this figurative language skill. Again, students read each example, circle whether it is a simile or metaphor, and then explain which two things are being compared. Also, I recommend that you have your high achieving students translate each example into literal language as well, particularly if you are assigning this as classwork. I find that some students work through these problems very quickly and need an additional cognitive task to keep them challenged.
Simile and Metaphor Worksheet 2 | RTF
Simile and Metaphor Worksheet 2 | PDF
Simile and Metaphor Worksheet 2 | Preview
Simile and Metaphor Worksheet 2 | Answers
Simile and Metaphor Worksheet 2 | Ereading Worksheet – Online Activity

Simile and Metaphor Worksheet 3 – Yet another 20 simile and metaphor examples to give students the practice that they need with distinguishing between similes and metaphors. As with the others, this worksheet uses two double-sided sheets, but you can save a lot of paper by not printing them at all. Just assign students the Ereading Worksheet at the bottom of this paragraph. It contains the same questions and long response field for explaining which two things are being compared. Of course, the online questions are graded automatically, offering instant feedback to students and reduced workload for teachers, and results can be printed, saved, emailed, or even shared to FaceBook. You should really give it a shot if your students have access to the Internet.
Simile and Metaphor Worksheet 3 | RTF
Simile and Metaphor Worksheet 3 | PDF
Simile and Metaphor Worksheet 3 | Preview
Simile and Metaphor Worksheet 3 | Answers
Simile and Metaphor Worksheet 3 | Ereading Worksheet – Online Activity

Simile and Metaphor Worksheet 4 – Here’s one more worksheet on similes and metaphors to help students master these techniques. This one is a little bit harder than the other three, but still pretty easy if you know what you’re doing. Again, students will read 20 examples of similes and metaphors. They will identify each technique and explain which two things are being compared. If your students can successfully complete this activity, they might be ready for a more challenging figurative language activity.
Simile and Metaphor Worksheet 4 | RTF
Simile and Metaphor Worksheet 4 | PDF
Simile and Metaphor Worksheet 4 | Preview
Simile and Metaphor Worksheet 4 | Answers
Simile and Metaphor Worksheet 4 | Ereading Worksheet – Online Activity

I hope that these worksheets give students an adequate amount of practice with identifying similes and metaphors. I believe that they will. If your students need more practice with figurative language and poetic devices, I have many more activities on this website. Check some of the links below to find your next activity. Thanks for visiting!

 

Common Core State Standards Related to Similes and Metaphors

Anchor Standards

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.R.4 – Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining technical, connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word choices shape meaning or tone.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.L.5 – Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.

Expand to View All Common Core State Standards Related to Similes and Metaphors
ELA Standards: Literature

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.3.4 – Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, distinguishing literal from nonliteral language.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.4.4 – Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including those that allude to significant characters found in mythology (e.g., Herculean).

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.5.4 – Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative language such as metaphors and similes.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.6.4 – Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of a specific word choice on meaning and tone.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.7.4 – Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of rhymes and other repetitions of sounds (e.g., alliteration) on a specific verse or stanza of a poem or section of a story or drama.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.8.4 – Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including analogies or allusions to other texts.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.4 – Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language evokes a sense of time and place; how it sets a formal or informal tone).

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.4 – Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful. (Include Shakespeare as well as other authors.)

ELA Standards: Language

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.3.5 – Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships and nuances in word meanings.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.4.5a – Explain the meaning of simple similes and metaphors (e.g., as pretty as a picture) in context.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.4.5b – Recognize and explain the meaning of common idioms, adages, and proverbs.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.5.5a – Interpret figurative language, including similes and metaphors, in context.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.5.5b – Recognize and explain the meaning of common idioms, adages, and proverbs.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.6.5a – Interpret figures of speech (e.g., personification) in context.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.5a – Interpret figures of speech (e.g., literary, biblical, and mythological allusions) in context.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.8.5a – Interpret figures of speech (e.g. verbal irony, puns) in context.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.5a – Interpret figures of speech (e.g., euphemism, oxymoron) in context and analyze their role in the text.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.11-12.5a – Interpret figures of speech (e.g., hyperbole, paradox) in context and analyze their role in the text.

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Common Core Lesson and Unit Plans
Understanding Common Core State Standards

 

Looking For More?
Figurative Language Worksheets
Figurative Language Activities
Figurative Language Poems with Questions
Simile Examples
Metaphor Examples
Idiom Worksheets
Hyperbole and Understatement Worksheets
Orpheus the Lyrical: Figurative Language Review Game
Poetry Cat: Poetic Devices Review Game

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2 Comments

  1. fatima

     /  December 29, 2016

    the last pdf link is broken!:(

    Reply
  2. Alia bhatt

     /  December 7, 2016

    it was an amazing time completing the worksheets and it was fun doing the online MCQ thanks navigation

    Reply

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