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Fact and Opinion Worksheets

Recognizing the difference between facts and opinions is a skill that is often evaluated on state reading tests.  In my experience I’ve found that students often get confused trying to determine whether a statement is factually accurate, and that is not the skill that is evaluated.  Therefore, I teach students that a fact is any statement that can be proven: “there are 10,000 feet in a mile.”  Even though this statement is incorrect, I teach students that this is still a fact, even though it is not true.  When students define a fact as any statement that can be proven to be true or false, they will concern themselves less with whether the statement is accurate and focus more on whether each statement can be proven.  Hence, they will better be able to identify facts and opinions.  I hope these worksheets and resources help you teach your students to reliably distinguish between statements of fact and opinion.  Learn more about teaching fact and opinion?

Fact and Opinion Lesson and Practice Activity – This is a short lesson teaching students to distinguish between facts and opinions.  It also includes a 10 question practice activity at the end of the lesson.
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Fact and Opinion Worksheet 1 – This double-sided worksheet contains 25 statements.  Students determine whether each statement is a fact or opinion, and then they explain their answers. Suggested reading level for this text: Grade 4-8
Fact and Opinion Worksheet 1 RTF
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Ereading Worksheet | Online Practice Assessment

Fact and Opinion Worksheet 2 – Another double-sided worksheet with 25 more problems.  Students read each statement, determine whether it is a fact or opinion, and then explain their answers. Suggested reading level for this text: Grade 3-7
Fact and Opinion Worksheet 2 RTF
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Ereading Worksheet | Online Practice Assessment

Fact and Opinion Worksheet 3 – Features 25 more fact and opinion problems. Each item is related to athletics, giving this worksheet a fun sports theme. In addition to identifying whether the statement is a fact or opinion, students explain how the statement might be proven if it is factual. Suggested reading level for this text: Grade 3-7
Fact and Opinion Worksheet 3 RTF
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Ereading Worksheet | Online Practice Assessment

Fact and Opinion Worksheet 4 – 25 more fact and opinion questions. This time the questions are about pizza. Students determine whether each statement is a fact or an opinion, and then they explain their answer. Suggested reading level for this text: Grade 2-6
Fact and Opinion Worksheet 4 RTF
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Fact and Opinion Worksheet 5 – Another 25 questions on fact and opinion. This time students read statement about cars and determine whether each statement is factual or not. Suggested reading level for this text: Grade 2-6
Fact and Opinion Worksheet 5 RTF
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Fact and Opinion Worksheet 6 – Still more questions on fact and opinion. This time students will read dance themed statements and determine whether they are facts or opinions. Students should also explain their answers. Suggested reading level for this text: Grade 2-6
Fact and Opinion Worksheet 6 RTF
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Common Core State Standards Related to Fact and Opinion

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.W.2 – Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.SL.4 – Present information, findings, and supporting evidence such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and the organization, development, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

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ELA Standards: Writing

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.1.2 – Write informative/explanatory texts in which they name a topic, supply some facts about the topic, and provide some sense of closure.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.2.2 – Write informative/explanatory texts in which they introduce a topic, use facts and definitions to develop points, and provide a concluding statement or section.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.3.2b – Develop the topic with facts, definitions, and details.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.4.2b – Develop the topic with facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples related to the topic.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.5.2b – Develop the topic with facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples related to the topic.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.6.2b – Develop the topic with relevant facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.7.2b – Develop the topic with relevant facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.8.2b – Develop the topic with relevant, well-chosen facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.2b – Develop the topic with well-chosen, relevant, and sufficient facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples appropriate to the audience’s knowledge of the topic.

ELA Standards: Speech

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.2.4 – Tell a story or recount an experience with appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive details, speaking audibly in coherent sentences.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.3.4 – Report on a topic or text, tell a story, or recount an experience with appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive details, speaking clearly at an understandable pace.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.4.4 – Report on a topic or text, tell a story, or recount an experience in an organized manner, using appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive details to support main ideas or themes; speak clearly at an understandable pace.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.5.4 – Report on a topic or text or present an opinion, sequencing ideas logically and using appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive details to support main ideas or themes; speak clearly at an understandable pace.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.6.4 – Present claims and findings, sequencing ideas logically and using pertinent descriptions, facts, and details to accentuate main ideas or themes; use appropriate eye contact, adequate volume, and clear pronunciation.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.7.4 – Present claims and findings, emphasizing salient points in a focused, coherent manner with pertinent descriptions, facts, details, and examples; use appropriate eye contact, adequate volume, and clear pronunciation.

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Common Core Lesson and Unit Plans
Understanding Common Core State Standards

 

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86 Comments

  1. Terra Cooley

     /  April 15, 2016

    Thank you so much for this site. I wish I would have known about your site all year. I normally teach math, so I need all the help I can get with Language.

    Reply
  2. Deokie Rattan

     /  March 16, 2016

    Thank you for these activities. they are really helplful and works in the classroom. I appreciate your work and what you are doing for teachers
    who just starts their career. May God continue to bless your administration and provide bountifully so that you all can achieve your goal and continue to be a blessing to millions of teachers.

    Reply
  3. bob

     /  March 9, 2016

    cool thanks for the facts i guess 8)

    Reply
  4. A. Peterson

     /  November 17, 2015

    Thank you for these activities. I have been using these in my introductory reading classes at three different community colleges. They really help students focus on biased language and spotting when an author’s personal bias has crept into an otherwise “factual” statement. Objective vs. Subjective is a big challenge for some students, especially now that “news” can come from a variety of heavily-biased sources and still be called “factual”. When we use these sheets in particular, I have to remind the students that it is NOT True-False, but rather focusing on whether it is stated factually (as in “Can it be verified?”) It seems that even some of your critics posting above struggle with this idea. Yes, as teachers we would promote the message that “Copying homework is wrong”, but this is not a fact. What is “wrong” is completely subjective – The kid who makes it through college by copying others’ work may face some comeuppance, but should he or she succeed and move into a successful career, they may be hard-pressed to deem what they did as “wrong”. In short, factual statements can be verified and require one answer. The opinions have varied answers “depending on who you ask”. My students totally get this. Let’s be realistic – if I tell my 18-year old students that “Copying homework is wrong” is not a fact, it’s not exactly going to shake civilization to its very foundations. Get over your selves.

    Reply

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