Get emails about new stuff.
Be the first to know.

Get emails about new stuff.
Don't worry. I hate spam too.

Fact and Opinion Worksheets

Recognizing the difference between facts and opinions is a skill that is often evaluated on state reading tests.  In my experience I’ve found that students often get confused trying to determine whether a statement is factually accurate, and that is not the skill that is evaluated.  Therefore, I teach students that a fact is any statement that can be proven: “there are 10,000 feet in a mile.”  Even though this statement is incorrect, I teach students that this is still a fact, even though it is not true.  When students define a fact as any statement that can be proven to be true or false, they will concern themselves less with whether the statement is accurate and focus more on whether each statement can be proven.  Hence, they will better be able to identify facts and opinions.  I hope these worksheets and resources help you teach your students to reliably distinguish between statements of fact and opinion.  Learn more about teaching fact and opinion?

Fact and Opinion Lesson and Practice Activity – This is a short lesson teaching students to distinguish between facts and opinions.  It also includes a 10 question practice activity at the end of the lesson.
Fact and Opinion Lesson PowerPoint


Fact and Opinion Worksheet 1 – This double-sided worksheet contains 25 statements.  Students determine whether each statement is a fact or opinion, and then they explain their answers. Suggested reading level for this text: Grade 4-8
Fact and Opinion Worksheet 1 | RTF
Fact and Opinion Worksheet 1 | PDF
Fact and Opinion Worksheet 1 | Preview
Fact and Opinion Worksheet 1 | Answers
Fact and Opinion Worksheet 1 | Ereading Worksheet

Fact and Opinion Worksheet 2 – Another double-sided worksheet with 25 more problems.  Students read each statement, determine whether it is a fact or opinion, and then explain their answers. Suggested reading level for this text: Grade 3-7
Fact and Opinion Worksheet 2 | RTF
Fact and Opinion Worksheet 2 | PDF
Fact and Opinion Worksheet 2 | Preview
Fact and Opinion Worksheet 2 | Answers
Fact and Opinion Worksheet 2 | Ereading Worksheet

Fact and Opinion Worksheet 3 – Features 25 more fact and opinion problems. Each item is related to athletics, giving this worksheet a fun sports theme. In addition to identifying whether the statement is a fact or opinion, students explain how the statement might be proven if it is factual. Suggested reading level for this text: Grade 3-7
Fact and Opinion Worksheet 3 | RTF
Fact and Opinion Worksheet 3 | PDF
Fact and Opinion Worksheet 3 | Preview
Fact and Opinion Worksheet 3 | Answers
Fact and Opinion Worksheet 3 | Ereading Worksheet

Fact and Opinion Worksheet 4 – 25 more fact and opinion questions. This time the questions are about pizza. Students determine whether each statement is a fact or an opinion, and then they explain their answer. Suggested reading level for this text: Grade 2-6
Fact and Opinion Worksheet 4 | RTF
Fact and Opinion Worksheet 4 | PDF
Fact and Opinion Worksheet 4 | Preview
Fact and Opinion Worksheet 4 | Answers
Fact and Opinion Worksheet 4 | Ereading Worksheet

Fact and Opinion Worksheet 5 – Another 25 questions on fact and opinion. This time students read statement about cars and determine whether each statement is factual or not. Suggested reading level for this text: Grade 2-6
Fact and Opinion Worksheet 5 | RTF
Fact and Opinion Worksheet 5 | PDF
Fact and Opinion Worksheet 5 | Preview
Fact and Opinion Worksheet 5 | Answers
Fact and Opinion Worksheet 5 | Ereading Worksheet

Fact and Opinion Worksheet 6 – Still more questions on fact and opinion. This time students will read dance themed statements and determine whether they are facts or opinions. Students should also explain their answers. Suggested reading level for this text: Grade 2-6
Fact and Opinion Worksheet 6 | RTF
Fact and Opinion Worksheet 6 | PDF
Fact and Opinion Worksheet 6 | Preview
Fact and Opinion Worksheet 6 | Answers
Fact and Opinion Worksheet 6 | Ereading Worksheet

 

Common Core State Standards Related to Fact and Opinion

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.W.2 – Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.SL.4 – Present information, findings, and supporting evidence such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and the organization, development, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

Expand to View All Common Core State Standards Related to Fact and Opinion
ELA Standards: Writing

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.1.2 – Write informative/explanatory texts in which they name a topic, supply some facts about the topic, and provide some sense of closure.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.2.2 – Write informative/explanatory texts in which they introduce a topic, use facts and definitions to develop points, and provide a concluding statement or section.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.3.2b – Develop the topic with facts, definitions, and details.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.4.2b – Develop the topic with facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples related to the topic.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.5.2b – Develop the topic with facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples related to the topic.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.6.2b – Develop the topic with relevant facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.7.2b – Develop the topic with relevant facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.8.2b – Develop the topic with relevant, well-chosen facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.2b – Develop the topic with well-chosen, relevant, and sufficient facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples appropriate to the audience’s knowledge of the topic.

ELA Standards: Speech

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.2.4 – Tell a story or recount an experience with appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive details, speaking audibly in coherent sentences.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.3.4 – Report on a topic or text, tell a story, or recount an experience with appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive details, speaking clearly at an understandable pace.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.4.4 – Report on a topic or text, tell a story, or recount an experience in an organized manner, using appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive details to support main ideas or themes; speak clearly at an understandable pace.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.5.4 – Report on a topic or text or present an opinion, sequencing ideas logically and using appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive details to support main ideas or themes; speak clearly at an understandable pace.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.6.4 – Present claims and findings, sequencing ideas logically and using pertinent descriptions, facts, and details to accentuate main ideas or themes; use appropriate eye contact, adequate volume, and clear pronunciation.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.7.4 – Present claims and findings, emphasizing salient points in a focused, coherent manner with pertinent descriptions, facts, details, and examples; use appropriate eye contact, adequate volume, and clear pronunciation.

View Source
Common Core Lesson and Unit Plans
Understanding Common Core State Standards

 

Looking For More Reading Worksheets?
Persuasive Essay Topics
Author’s Purpose Worksheets
All Reading Worksheets

Still looking for something? Search here.

Leave a comment

108 Comments

  1. Thompson

     /  March 10, 2015

    This is garbage! It is not a “fact” if it is not true. No wonder kids can’t think anymore or distinguish right from wrong.

    Reply
  2. Jason McCool

     /  March 7, 2015

    “I teach students that a fact is any statement that can be proven: ‘there are 10,000 feet in a mile.’ Even though this statement is incorrect, I teach students that this is still a fact, even though it is not true.” That definition is contrary to all historical definitions of “facts” as specifically true and correlating to reality. This explains a lot about our failing schools. By your definition, the statement “black is white” is a fact, which is preposterous.

    Reply
  3. Shannon Morris

     /  March 5, 2015

    You say, ‘I teach students that a fact is any statement that can be proven: “there are 10,000 feet in a mile.” Even though this statement is incorrect, I teach students that this is still a fact, even though it is not true. When students define a fact as any statement that can be proven to be true or false, they will concern themselves less with whether the statement is accurate and focus more on whether each statement can be proven. Hence, they will better be able to identify facts and opinions.’

    So you’re saying that a statement can be proven to be false, but it’s still a fact??

    Reply
  4. Ian Wardell

     /  March 4, 2015

    I find it highly disturbing that children are indoctrinated into accepting such transparent nonsense.

    The net is full of materialists and scientists who say similar things. However clearly there are facts which cannot be proven, indeed they might well be facts which cannot *even in principle* be proven.

    This is essentially logical positivism which was supposed to have been decisively discredited decades ago! It’s scientists which propagate such nonsense, not philosophers!

    Reply
  5. Matt Skene

     /  March 3, 2015

    There are people whose job it is to make careful conceptual distinctions such as the one between facts and opinions. They’re called professional philosophers. I am one, and I know a whole bunch of them. Not a single one would accept the distinctions you’re making here. The fact that you’re teaching them to students is deeply troubling.

    A fact is a true proposition.

    An opinion is a proposition that is accepted by an individual.

    Neither term has anything to do with proof.

    Also, there is significant disagreement about what is required to prove something, and a number of your examples don’t uncontroversially fall into the provable/unprovable distinction that you’re trying to test for as a substitute for the fact/opinion distinction. In particular, the majority of philosophers believe it is possible to prove certain moral claims are true. While this is a controversial matter to some extent, simply teaching students that they are all unprovable is rejecting the majority opinion of experts in a field you obviously aren’t very familiar with. This usually isn’t a good idea.

    Reply
    • Hi.

      Thank you for your input.
      I’m going to back away from this now and leave it to the professionals.

      I do appreciate the feedback.

      Reply
    • Jonas

       /  September 3, 2015

      omg so relieved to see your post on this article Matt Skene. I was troubled by it as well. SO BAD AHHHHHHHHHHHHH. The unwillingness of the author to engage with any dissent is very telling… again… AHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH

      Reply
  6. Mike

     /  March 2, 2015

    I strongly disagree. To say that cheating (copying homework in your worksheet) is wrong would be a fact. I can’t believe anyone would teach children that morality is “whatever the group you are in decides.” Theft, murder, slavery, rape, and so on are all morally acceptable if the society decides they are? That’s obviously false.

    Reply
    • Is going to war morally acceptable? Some people think not under any conditions. Some people think so under certain conditions, so called “good wars.” Others believe it is the way of the world.

      We have ventured into a philosophical realm from which I would like to return.
      Please note that I am sharing my personal view with adults who have inquired as to what they are.

      I do not teach children my personal views nor do I promote murder in the classroom.

      Reply
  7. Jim

     /  March 2, 2015

    Is morality a fact or opinion? Do you provide guidance as to when it is proper to question facts and opinion?

    Reply
    • Good question.

      It is my belief that all morality is a set of opinions. Though very popular, widely accepted, and well-established sets of opinions that we call “morality” exist (i.e. Do not kill people). These opinions vary by culture (i.e. Can soldier kill during wartime? Can the state execute a person who has committed horrible crimes?). Even within broad cultures are more subsets (i.e. Do not kill or harm animals). Since there is no objective way to prove these beliefs, they cannot be facts.

      As to your second question, I believe that one should always question facts but only challenge opinions if you’re prepared to make enemies, or in personal cases when a loved one’s opinion might cause harm.

      Reply
      • Peter Lupu

         /  March 3, 2015

        Mr. Morton

        First, claiming that “facts can be proven” is misleading if you mean either that “all facts can be proven” or that it is part of the meaning of the concept of a “fact” that it can be proven (the second entails the first). Not all facts can be proven (by whom?): there are many facts that cannot and never will be proven (by us!). There is a fact about exactly how many dinosaurs existed. But we will never be able to prove it. Second, the concept of proof is much more complicated than what you are suggesting. Perhaps, in mathematics we have something like a proof. Most scientific claims have various degrees of evidence, but cannot ever be proven. Third, what you call ‘facts’ are really reasonably well confirmed opinions based upon (what is believed to be) a reliable methodology. What you call ‘opinions’ are less well established beliefs that lack confirmation based upon a reliable methodology. So the distinctions you are making here are too fast, too loose, and highly misleading. But you are not alone in making them. This is, I believe, the import of the question above by Jim.

        Reply
        • Well, it is a complicated and rich subject worthy of dialog. Perhaps my position is indefensible, or perhaps others could defend it. In either case I do not have the time to challenge your arguments, Mr. Lupu. Best wishes!

          Reply
  8. Tulasi Pratti

     /  January 6, 2015

    This is an amazing website for students.It helped my son in improving his language skills .Thanks to the creators

    Reply
  9. Michael

     /  November 20, 2014

    I like to see the approach of facts having the ability to be untrue. I’ve been having a debate with my fellow teachers about this. I have one for you, what about sentences like this:
    “My favorite food is pizza.” (and let’s assume this is true.) Most teachers say it’s an opinion, but I don’t. What are your thoughts?
    Here’s another that stumped my 2nd graders:
    Fire is hot. (all teachers said fact, I still lean towards opinion, heavily! 🙂

    thanks!

    Reply
    • Wow, Michael, those are some interesting questions.
      I definitely see your argument.

      I would argue that “My favorite food is pizza” is an opinion,
      given its inability to be measured, but I see where you are going.

      The “Fire is hot” example is tricky too.
      You’ve got some real mind-benders.

      It could be argued that since fire radiates heat,
      it is by nature hot;

      but it is cooler than magma.

      Hmm… I’m stumped.
      Thanks for sharing those.

      Reply
  10. melody binay

     /  November 12, 2014

    thank you so much
    you help not only me but my pupils too

    Reply
  11. Atef Mekdad

     /  September 20, 2014

    You’ve been of great help to me as a teacher. Thank you very much.

    Reply
  12. This is a great site it need more work sheets

    Reply
    • Thank you. I am literally going to double the amount of content this July / August.

      I think that you will like it.

      Reply
  13. I LOVE THIS WEBSITE IT HAS HELPED ME A LOT

    Reply
  14. I LOVE THIS WEBSITE IT HAS HELPED ME A LOT. I GOT A LEVEL 5 IN MY SATS IN YEAR 6 I AM VERY IMPRESSED.

    WOW!!!!!!!!!!!!

    Reply
  15. simply superb!

    Reply
  16. Julie

     /  March 5, 2014

    answer 17 on Fact or Opinion Worksheet 1 is definitely FALSE, not even an opinion. Surely you didn’t fall for an urban legend?

    http://urbanlegends.about.com/od/fooddrink/a/kfc_chicken_2.htm

    Reply
    • I’m such a dummy.
      I’m going to fix this…

      soon…

      Reply
      • Timo

         /  January 14, 2015

        Well, it is a FALSE fact – it worked well in my class because you can prove it wrong just like the example in the lesson: 10 inches in a foot.

        Reply
  17. J Vasilko

     /  February 3, 2014

    Thank you very much for sharing your resources. I have used many of them since I began teaching middle school ELA last year.

    My question about your fact and opinion worksheets is: what exactly do you expect students to explain about their answers? Can you give me some examples?

    Thanks again!

    Reply
    • I am sorry that I am slow to respond to your question.
      I will post answers with explanations this summer.

      Best wishes!

      Reply
  18. Paige

     /  January 30, 2014

    THANK YOU! My ESL students struggle with reading, especially the deeper aspects such as making inferences and finding the author’s purpose. This will help them a lot! Thanks again!

    Reply
  19. MissNaddy

     /  December 3, 2013

    Hi there!
    Well, i would like to enquire on your power point slides on fact and opinion..

    u’ve stated that “Facts maybe true or false”

    well, im confused on the part that …”facts maybe false”… do u have other examples? i find it difficult to explain it to my students…

    TQ..and btw, this is a really helpful and informative website..keep up the good work ya 😉

    Reply
    • Hello,

      I’ve had people argue with me before about this,
      so I no longer argue about it,

      but here’s how I do it.

      My students often got caught up trying to determine whether
      facts were accurate or not that they would over think the question.

      I found it helpful to teach them that statements of a factual nature
      can be proven to be true or false,

      and that they shouldn’t worry about whether they are true or false,
      but rather just determine whether they are factual in nature or an opinion.

      I hope that helps.

      Reply
  20. haleemasadia

     /  November 14, 2013

    A bundle of thanks.Prodigious efforts in facilitating teachers with this wonderful resource.

    Reply
  21. moniqueneita

     /  September 14, 2013

    I am a teacher from Jamaica thanks for your website. The worksheets are a great help.

    Reply
  22. Evelynn Estrada

     /  June 13, 2013

    Just found this website, very good work
    Wiill use with my prep students

    Reply
  23. Princess Kate

     /  May 15, 2013

    My daughter will grow up to be a smart princess because of this website!

    Reply
  24. Irfan Farooq, IMS, BZU Multan

     /  May 5, 2013

    Thank you so much for this lesson …

    Reply
  25. SHAMe

     /  May 1, 2013

    it was very useful 🙂 ty.

    Reply
  26. Saraj

     /  March 10, 2013

    thank you so much for this, my students struggle with this, and I believe the worksheets on your site will help.

    Reply
  27. Jason P

     /  February 18, 2013

    Well done!! Thank you sir 🙂

    Reply
  28. Gilbert

     /  January 10, 2013

    I totally enjoyed your good works I am planning to use some of your worksheets to enhance my lesson plans that is if its OK with you.
    Thanks for educators like you who can help other educators like me.

    Reply
  29. Teacher Me

     /  January 10, 2013

    Thanks, your website has save me a lot of time.

    Reply
  30. Teacher Thess

     /  December 2, 2012

    Thanks! this site helped me a lot..=)

    Reply
  31. Teacher Blesi

     /  November 27, 2012

    Thank you for sharing. The activities here are a real time-saver.

    Reply
  32. Jill

     /  November 7, 2012

    Thank you so much! This is my first year teaching high school ELL (beginner, intermediate and advanced), and your site has been a HUGE help!

    Reply
  33. Pam O'Kell

     /  October 31, 2012

    You fact or opinion worksheet #22 contains a potential for students to receive inappropriate material. The statement should be excluded. Please do not publish this statement. Please contact me if you wish to discuss. Thank you.

    Reply
    • Yeah, I prefer to leave it as is. Thanks for warning others of the issue, however. #22 contains a reference to Waka Flocka, a rather profane rap artist.

      Reply
  34. Scott

     /  October 9, 2012

    This website is inspiring, furthermore it is helping me very well. 😀

    Reply
  35. Judy Price

     /  October 6, 2012

    Thank you so much! This site is exactly what I needed. I am a special education teacher and my students need the extra practice. The short stories are just the right length and my students find them entertaining.

    Reply
  36. Great ! <3

    Reply
  37. I’ m 1st yr. college student taking Study and Thinking Skills…… while I was surfing for some exercises in my previous topic, and I saw this site and I was very thankful,

    I’m sure that I will use this not only now, but up to I finish my studies.

    Reply
  38. D. Vincent

     /  August 7, 2012

    I just printed out some of your worksheets for my son to utilize as a precursor to his upcoming curriculum this year. I’m happy to say, like many other kids, even though he really doesn’t like doing homework, he looks forward to working on these exercises. He even proposed to me that I print more for him to do. You have my gratitude and you should know, he’s flourishing and excelling rapidly already! Thank you!!

    -D. Vincent

    Reply
  39. Mr. Smith

     /  July 7, 2012

    WOW!!! THis web link is so good this is all i use!!

    Reply
  40. this website is helpful!

    Reply
  41. May

     /  June 24, 2012

    Great Stuff!

    Reply
  42. E. Nelson

     /  April 17, 2012

    My students and I enjoyed this website. Thank you so much for your time and effort.
    E. Nelson
    2nd grade

    Reply
  43. Claudine

     /  April 13, 2012

    I just found this site and love it.

    Reply
  44. Kathy

     /  March 25, 2012

    Great site! I love this!

    Reply
  45. norwood

     /  March 25, 2012

    LOVE THIS WEBSITE! I am an ESOL teacher who works with the advanced ELL students. They still need the scaffolding and this is a great resource to start them off and then build the critical thinking skills. LOVE IT. Keep it up. It makes planning so much easier! 🙂 Thank you.

    Reply
    • Thank you for visiting. I’ve got a bunch of more activities and worksheets I’m just waiting to find time to post.

      Reply
  46. Mrs. Here

     /  January 18, 2012

    Could I have the answer key to these exercises please?
    Thanks a lot,

    Reply
  47. Liz Vivanco

     /  December 14, 2011

    I love your site! I’ve been teaching Bilingual/ELL, and this is the first year I have one class each of general ed language arts, accelerated LA, and a mix of ELL and gen ed LA for 8th grade. It’s been tough to come up with lessons for all the different levels of students, but your powerpoints and worksheets make it so much easier! I especially enjoy your examples: “Waka Flocka is a lot tougher than Justin Bieber.” Lol! Throw in a few references to Prince Royce and you’ll hook the full gamut. I tell my kids I use your stuff, and they’re constantly asking me if worksheets I make up are from Mr. Morton…we’re all big fans.

    Reply
    • Mr. Morton

       /  December 14, 2011

      Wow, that’s really awesome and inspiring. You’ve moved me to post a new fact and opinion worksheet. Bieber is way tougher than Flocka BTW.

      Reply
  48. Mr. Hughes

     /  November 29, 2011

    Fabulous stuff can’t wait to see what else is here

    Reply
  49. Thanks for such a wonderful website. My students really enjoy the activities.

    Reply
  1. Complex Times « Monday Musings

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

By Using This Website You Agree to the Terms of Use and are aware of our privacy policy.