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Text Structure Interactive Quiz

Are you looking for practice activities to review text structure and patterns of organization? Are you sick of wasting paper on printing out worksheets? Check out these interactive text structure quizzes. Students can take the quizzes and print the results; they can even just mail you screen shots with a little instruction. I hope that you’ll find these activities helpful in understanding and reviewing text structures.

Text Structure Practice

Text Structure Practice 1
Text Structure Practice 2
Text Structure Practice 3
Text Structure Practice Quiz 4


 

Learn about Text Structure

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Common Core State Standards Related to Text Structure

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.R.5 – Analyze the structure of texts, including how specific sentences, paragraphs, and larger portions of the text (e.g., a section, chapter, scene, or stanza) relate to each other and the whole.

Expand to View All Common Core State Standards Related to Text Structure
ELA Standards: Informational Texts

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.4.5 – Describe the overall structure (e.g., chronology, comparison, cause/effect, problem/solution) of events, ideas, concepts, or information in a text or part of a text.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.5.5 – Compare and contrast the overall structure (e.g., chronology, comparison, cause/effect, problem/solution) of events, ideas, concepts, or information in two or more texts.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.6.5 – Analyze how a particular sentence, paragraph, chapter, or section fits into the overall structure of a text and contributes to the development of the ideas.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.7.5 – Analyze the structure an author uses to organize a text, including how the major sections contribute to the whole and to the development of the ideas.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.8.5 – Analyze in detail the structure of a specific paragraph in a text, including the role of particular sentences in developing and refining a key concept.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.11-12.5 – Analyze and evaluate the effectiveness of the structure an author uses in his or her exposition or argument, including whether the structure makes points clear, convincing, and engaging.

View Source
Common Core Lesson and Unit Plans
Understanding Common Core State Standards

 

Looking For Something Else?
Text Structure Worksheets
Text Structure Activities
Information About Text Structures
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All Reading Worksheets

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11 Comments

  1. Jamailla Evans

     /  August 18, 2017

    I totally get it now!

    Reply
  2. Zealand

     /  January 8, 2017

    This is soooooo awesome. I hope I can make a website one day.

    Reply
  3. YoungBull55

     /  March 25, 2015

    From a kids stand point this is cool and informative

    Reply
  4. ashe

     /  September 30, 2014

    this is a wonderful site it help me out a lot.

    Reply
  5. John

     /  April 9, 2014

    This website is so helpful yet incredibly bland i suggest a deeper color scale

    Reply
  6. Lea

     /  December 12, 2012

    Mr. Morton, kudos to you! I would like to discuss something regarding chronological order and sequence with you. I hope you will write back to me. It’s proving more than challenging for my students.

    Reply
    • I am open to discussion.

      I understand them to be different in that chronological order has a specific time and setting, even if that setting is somewhere at some undisclosed time. If it occurs at a specific time, it is chronologically organized.

      Sequence, on the other hand, can occur at ANY time and place. For example, think about a recipe to make pancakes or directions to get to the mall. When did those events occur? Well, they could occur at anytime and place, hence the information is sequentially organized. Now, if I were to tell you a story about a time I made pancakes in a specific place, my information would be chronologically organized. Or at least that’s how I understand the concept.

      Best wishes!

      Reply
  7. Charla

     /  December 12, 2012

    Mr. Morton, your website is an amazing resource. Is it current with the new Common Core Standards?

    Reply
  8. Melissa Rainey

     /  January 21, 2012

    THANK YOU–You saved me hours of searching for good examples on this difficult concept for my struggling learners. I cannot thank you enough. What an excellent website!

    Reply

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